Titan Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

Complex 571-7 is now home to the Titan Missile Museum. This site held a Titan II missile on 24-hour alert from 1963 to 1987. This tour is awesome! The guides are very knowledgeable and took us all over the complex.

After entering the Access Portal, we took the stairs down 35 feet underground to the Blast Lock Area. Each pair of blast doors had interlocks, so that one had to be closed before the next was opened.

Then we were taken to the Launch Control Center, where our guide explained all the equipment, talked about the duties of the crew, and took us through the process of launching a missile (just 58 seconds!). The station was manned 24-7 by a 4 person crew, and the only place a person was allowed to be alone was in the crew quarters.

Titan II Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

The red locker held the launch codes. The Titan II was the most powerful ICBM built by the US. In about a half-hour, the 9-megaton warhead could reach targets 6000 miles away. Thankfully, no one ever had to access those launch codes.

Titan II Missile Museum

The Control Center was designed to withstand a nuclear blast and was basically a hanging cage underground. Gigantic springs would have absorbed some of the shock of a blast.

After the Control Center, we walked across the Cableway to the Decontamination Area and the Launch Silo.

Titan II Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

Then we walked back through the Cableway and climbed the stairs to exit the Access Portal. The Silo door is open and you can see the missile from above. There are lots of signs explaining the history of the Titan II missile, the various radar and communications systems, and engines on display.

Titan II Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

Titan II Missile Museum

Although the Titan II was built for destruction, it was also used to launch satellites, probes to Mars, and the Gemini astronauts into space.

 

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